Three Startups Aiming to Disrupt Immigration Law

Gabrielle Orum Hernández, Legaltech News

The crowd chants in favor of immigration law reform during a massive rally held at the Mall in Washington, D.C., on Monday, April 10, 2006. The crowd, estimated at 500,000, stretched from the Washington Monument to near the Capitol. Organized by the National Capital Immigration Coalition (NCIC), the rally was part of a nationwide web of rallies, with 142 cities represented. The rally featured speeches by labor union leaders, faith sector leaders, and prominent politicians such as Senator Ted Kennedy. NCIC leaders and other grassroots organizations plan to convene to outline future steps in bringing more immigrants out on election day, and to map out a strategy for political action in favor of immigration reform and immigrant rights. Photo by Diego M. Radzinschi/LEGAL TIMES.
The crowd chants in favor of immigration law reform during a massive rally held at the Mall in Washington, D.C., on Monday, April 10, 2006. The crowd, estimated at 500,000, stretched from the Washington Monument to near the Capitol. Organized by the National Capital Immigration Coalition (NCIC), the rally was part of a nationwide web of rallies, with 142 cities represented. The rally featured speeches by labor union leaders, faith sector leaders, and prominent politicians such as Senator Ted Kennedy. NCIC leaders and other grassroots organizations plan to convene to outline future steps in bringing more immigrants out on election day, and to map out a strategy for political action in favor of immigration reform and immigrant rights. Photo by Diego M. Radzinschi/LEGAL TIMES.

These three companies are using technology to cut through complex bureaucracy and pricey attorney expenses to help users prepare their immigration applications.

Navigating the U.S. immigration process is known to be a headache and a half—not only do potential applicants need to properly categorize their current status, but they need to figure out which specific forms and addendums to submit, make no factual errors, and submit their names to exceedingly long waitlists.

At present, all applicants have to fill out and submit paper forms to their local immigration office. Though U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has promised an online submission system for immigration applications, it’s not expected to be completed and functional until 2019 at the earliest. Continue reading Three Startups Aiming to Disrupt Immigration Law

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