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Artificial Intelligence

U.S. AI, IoT, CAV, and Privacy Legislative Update – Second Quarter 2021

Covington

Covington & Burling LLP

In this update, we detail the key legislative developments in the second quarter of 2021 related to artificial intelligence (“AI”), the Internet of Things (“IoT”), connected and automated vehicles (“CAVs”), and federal privacy legislation. As we recently covered on May 12, President Biden signed an Executive Order to strengthen the federal government’s ability to respond to and prevent cybersecurity threats, including by removing obstacles to sharing threat information between private sector entities and federal agencies and modernizing federal systems. On the hill, lawmakers have introduced a number of proposals to regulate AI, IoT, CAVs, and privacy.

Artificial Intelligence

In Q2, members of Congress introduced a variety of legislative proposals to regulate AI—ranging from light touches to more prescriptive approaches.

  • A number of bills would provide funding for AI-related research and training. Most notably, the United States Innovation and Competition Act of 2021 ( 1260), introduced by Senator Chuck Schumer (D-NY) and which passed by the Senate, would invest more than $200 billion into U.S. scientific and technological innovation over the next five years. In particular, the bill would create the Directorate for Technology and Innovation within the National Science Foundation to research AI and machine learning, among other areas. The Artificial Intelligence for the Military Act of 2021 (S. 1776), introduced by Senator Rob Portman (R-OH), would require the introduction of curriculum for professional military education to incorporate courses of emerging technologies, like AI.
  • Several bills introduced this quarter have focused on the privacy implications of AI. For instance, the Mind Your Own Business Act of 2021 (S. 1444), introduced by Senator Ron Wyden (D-OR), would authorize the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) to create regulations requiring covered entities to, among other requirements, conduct impact assessments of “high-risk automated decision systems” (which includes certain AI tools) and “high-risk information systems” that “pose a significant risk to the privacy or security” of consumers’ personal information. Likewise, the Algorithmic Justice and Online Platform Transparency Act of 2021 (S. 1896), introduced by Senator Ed Markey (D-MA), would require online platforms to describe to users the types of algorithmic processes they employ and the information they collected; publish annual public reports detailing their content moderation practices; and maintain detailed records describing their algorithmic process for review by the FTC.
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Artificial Intelligence business law

Artificial intelligence and law

Vladyslav Shcherbatiuk, ME-110i, KNEU

From the pages of books of science fiction writers’, predictions of futurists and guesses of people, artificial intelligence confidently comes into our lives. And the closer the day, when AI will stand on one level of consciousness with people, the more today’s philosophers, lawyers and interested public enter discussions about possible future AI rights, of course the legal part of this question.

First of all, let’s define what is Artificial intelligence.

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Artificial Intelligence

How AI Accelerates the Legal Contract Drafting Process

AI and legal contract drafting process

Artificial intelligence (AI) has changed how we operate in almost every facet of our lives. From digital assistants that anticipate when to order paper towels to cars that can drive themselves, AI is everywhere. Law firms can also benefit from the vast advantages AI offers.

More specifically, the way in which AI changes contracts is especially impressive. Contract management, particularly drafting, can be a costly and labor-intensive process. For people dealing with large volumes of contracts, the drafting process can become a full-time job.

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