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Artificial Intelligence

U.S. AI, IoT, CAV, and Privacy Legislative Update – Second Quarter 2021

Covington

Covington & Burling LLP

In this update, we detail the key legislative developments in the second quarter of 2021 related to artificial intelligence (“AI”), the Internet of Things (“IoT”), connected and automated vehicles (“CAVs”), and federal privacy legislation. As we recently covered on May 12, President Biden signed an Executive Order to strengthen the federal government’s ability to respond to and prevent cybersecurity threats, including by removing obstacles to sharing threat information between private sector entities and federal agencies and modernizing federal systems. On the hill, lawmakers have introduced a number of proposals to regulate AI, IoT, CAVs, and privacy.

Artificial Intelligence

In Q2, members of Congress introduced a variety of legislative proposals to regulate AI—ranging from light touches to more prescriptive approaches.

  • A number of bills would provide funding for AI-related research and training. Most notably, the United States Innovation and Competition Act of 2021 ( 1260), introduced by Senator Chuck Schumer (D-NY) and which passed by the Senate, would invest more than $200 billion into U.S. scientific and technological innovation over the next five years. In particular, the bill would create the Directorate for Technology and Innovation within the National Science Foundation to research AI and machine learning, among other areas. The Artificial Intelligence for the Military Act of 2021 (S. 1776), introduced by Senator Rob Portman (R-OH), would require the introduction of curriculum for professional military education to incorporate courses of emerging technologies, like AI.
  • Several bills introduced this quarter have focused on the privacy implications of AI. For instance, the Mind Your Own Business Act of 2021 (S. 1444), introduced by Senator Ron Wyden (D-OR), would authorize the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) to create regulations requiring covered entities to, among other requirements, conduct impact assessments of “high-risk automated decision systems” (which includes certain AI tools) and “high-risk information systems” that “pose a significant risk to the privacy or security” of consumers’ personal information. Likewise, the Algorithmic Justice and Online Platform Transparency Act of 2021 (S. 1896), introduced by Senator Ed Markey (D-MA), would require online platforms to describe to users the types of algorithmic processes they employ and the information they collected; publish annual public reports detailing their content moderation practices; and maintain detailed records describing their algorithmic process for review by the FTC.
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Artificial Intelligence Law

Artificial Intelligence and Law.

Artificial Intelligence and Law

MONGOUE YANGOP FRANCIS DERRICK, EO-204i, KNEU

INTRODUCTION

What is palpable today is the confluence of the legal world, which is an environment of tradition and ancestral values ​​evolving thanks to new technologies. These technologies are not necessarily disruptive, they are sometimes reasoned. Artificial Intelligence can seize the right.

“Code is Law”, the superposition of this famous Lessig maxim, provides an interesting insight into the politics of given architectures. The A.I. will certainly bring about many upheavals, but lawyers will know how to deal with it. The challenge will be to ensure that it is AI that is invested by lawyers and not vice versa.

The rise of Legaltech, these famous law startups, seems to have taken the lead in terms of digitalization of the legal sector. The use of technology and software to offer legal services and make the law more accessible, implies that the Legaltech sector disrupts the law in its own way, very often based on developed and efficient algorithms.

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Artificial Intelligence штучний інтелект

Artificial Intelligence and Law

Anisia Tatarintseva, 110i, KNEU

Introduction

Of all the jobs robots might one day take over, there are some that have always seemed off limits. For example, artificial intelligence could never gain the creativity to be an artist or a musician (except it has), learn the human emotions necessary to write comedy (sorry, that too), or possess the analytical thinking you need to become a lawyer. Well, every one of those has proven to be false. In fact, AI has been helping humans with their minor legal inconveniences for several years now. It’s only going to get more advanced from here.

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